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Is This Evidence That Sinkholes Are Trying To Be More Subtle?

DECEMBER 2, 2015  —  By Mike Cahill  
Mike Cahill

Mike Cahill

Mike is ViralNova's resident Editor of the Weird. If it makes you say "OMG! That's terrible!!!" then Mike probably wrote it. Despite the subject of his articles Mike is surprisingly well adjusted. When he's not writing, he's making music, performing, and producing podcasts.

When it comes to natural disasters, you might not think too much about sinkholes in comparison to floods and earthquakes. But depending on where you live in the world, you'll probably encounter a sinkhole before you fall victim to either of those disasters.

But if you're in California, you might just encounter all three at the same time.

Back on November 19, residents of Los Angeles County, California, were enjoying a normal afternoon. Suddenly, the ground near one of the area's famous mountain highways, Vasquez Canyon Road, started to buckle and crack for no apparent reason.

The photo above -- which was provided by the LA County Department of Public Works -- shows just how quickly and dramatically the upheaval happened.

Up close, the damage was even worse.

Up close, the damage was even worse.

Getty Images

Local police were baffled, so they called in geologists from UCLA to figure out what happened. This being California and all, the first suspect was a localized earthquake. However, seismic recorders in the area showed no evidence of an earthquake.

Some of the geologists who examined the scene said that the damage could have been caused by a progressive landslide, though there's not much evidence to support that claim, either.

Some of the geologists who examined the scene said that the damage could have been caused by a progressive landslide, though there's not much evidence to support that claim, either.

Getty Images

According to the Department of Public Works, the road buckled as much as 14 feet in some places.

According to the Department of Public Works, the road buckled as much as 14 feet in some places.

Getty Images

Regardless of what caused the road to crumple, it's going to be a while before it reopens to the public.

Regardless of what caused the road to crumple, it's going to be a while before it reopens to the public.

Getty Images

(via Mysterious Universe)

As you might have guessed from my intro, I suspect that there is actually a giant sinkhole growing under the road in that area. Though I have absolutely no evidence to support that theory, I think that time will prove me right.

 

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