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Before He Wrote 'Alice In Wonderland,' Lewis Carroll Took Creepy Photographs

DECEMBER 9, 2015  —  By Mike Cahill  
Mike Cahill

Mike Cahill

Mike is ViralNova's resident Editor of the Weird. If it makes you say "OMG! That's terrible!!!" then Mike probably wrote it. Despite the subject of his articles Mike is surprisingly well adjusted. When he's not writing, he's making music, performing, and producing podcasts.

By the time most of us hit puberty, we'd read (or at least seen the movie version of) Alice In Wonderland several times over. The story is a rite of passage, and it's revered by millions of people all over the world.

Almost equally revered is the author, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who's better known as Lewis Carroll. But he wasn't always a writer. He began his professional life by running his own photography studio.

Between 1856 and 1880, Carroll was fully committed to photography.

According to scholars, he took at least 3,000 pictures during this time period.

While that number is not especially impressive by today's standards, it was notoriously difficult to take and develop that much film in the craft's early years.

Of the original collection of Carroll's photographs, only 1,000 survive today.

Despite the fact that these photos were taken by a famous children's author, they still manage to be pretty darned creepy.

A large portion of Carroll's portfolio is made up of portraits of little girls, but there are also photos of old buildings, dolls, dogs, families, statues, and trees in his collection.

By 1880, the difficulty of running a photography studio started getting to Carroll, so he quit and took up writing instead.

His years of working behind the camera were not a total loss. While he was shooting one day, he met a young girl by the name of Alice Pleasance Liddell. Carroll based the character of Alice in Alice In Wonderland on her.

(via Dangerous Minds)

Those photographs are seriously haunting. I understand that Carroll was trying to be artful, but this collection is still pretty unsettling.